Common sense vs. extreme liberalism

I was reading David Brooks, and he referenced the interview above. A writer from the Atlantic also wrote in depth about the misleading tricks of the interviewer. Check it out. The interview was better than I could have ever imagined. I definitely want to check out Jordan Peterson’s work. The patience he exhibits in this interview is amazing. Newman tries several times to oversimplify and mischaracterize Peterson’s words and (in my opinion) even goes as far as to turn her willful misinterpretations into personal attacks, but instead of getting angry or throwing it back at her, Peterson simply and calmly corrects her.

(Probably) Last post of the year

Thanks to everyone who continues to check in here from time to time. I’ve been slow with updates. It’s not going to get better in the near future, though I hope it will get better in the not-too-distant future. I wanted to update y’all on personal news, as well as share some closing thoughts for the year.

I’ve been personally busier than ever before. My kids are getting older. As kids move up to the higher grades, schoolwork becomes more and more important. Both of my kids have new responsibilities that they need to learn to manage. My older one especially–he’s now going to a larger, more diverse school. Class sizes are much bigger, and often teachers just don’t care. My kids have added a few extracurriculars as well.

MOOC’s and online learning

I’ve posted about this sort of thing in the past, but seeing the most recent conversation about learning and technology, I thought I’d post it up again. I’ve recently taken two online courses. I completed the Attain N3 level Japanese course from Attain through the Udemy platform, as well as the Learning How To Learn course on Coursera. Both courses were really good.

Is online learning better than attending a college lecture or a small group section?

Kazuo Ishiguro Wins the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature

Kazuo Ishiguro, Photo credit: Andrew Testa for the NY Times

Kazuo Ishiguro has finally won. He’s been deserving this prize for a long time. The Remains of the Day is one of the greatest English novels ever written. Never Let Me Go was amazing. A Pale View of Hills was good too. I’m going to check out some of his other books.

If you want to read something interesting about Ishiguro, check out how he wrote The Remains of the Day in four weeks. I’m really happy he decided to have the butler open up at the end.

Goodbye, Identity Politics. Goodbye, Asian American Identity

How timely. I’ve had this idea for this particular short post in my head all summer, and today David Brooks published this: In Praise of Equipoise. Now I don’t know about leadership or crossing over to do the kind of outreach that Brooks is describing, but I do know that identity politics is killing this country. Both the Alt-Right and Black Lives Matter are filled with narcissistic blowhards who talk too much, and both are responsible for fomenting hatred. Asian American activism has been ruined, especially by the so-called Asian American feminists. We (the commenters on this site and I) have spent the last few years railing against the sickening disease of victimization that has plagued both the Black community and the Asian American leftist community, but we’ve done so mostly within the framework of being in those communities. It’s time for us and identity politics to declare an amicable split. So I’m done.

No shades of grey

Aight, I went on a camping trip before the Charlottesville protests, and I came back to find that someone died at the protests and the world is even angrier at Trump for doing nothing for two days. Four business executives, including Under Armour, Intel, and Merck, quit Trump’s manufacturing council. David Duke tweeted to Trump, “I would recommend you take a good look in the mirror & remember it was White Americans who put you in the presidency, not radical leftists,” which is completely false–it was actually the radical leftists, not the White Supremacists, who put Trump in office. It seems like everyone’s got it backwards.

Homeownership, an engine of inequality?

Photo credit: Damon Cesarez for the NY Times


This is one of the more interesting articles that I’ve recently seen. The author argues that homeownership has been one of the biggest drivers of inequality. Americans have most of their net worth in homes, and government incentives, such as housing loans and the mortgage interest deduction (MID), help people buy homes and artificially prop up housing prices.

I appreciated the history, but I’m not sure how much I agree with the opinions raised in this article. There are lots of benefits to owning a home. You can’t be evicted, a landlord can’t raise your rent, and you have a place for your family to live. Owning a home allows you to begin building a stable life for your family. You are guaranteed access to the schools in your neighborhood, and if you live in a neighborhood with good neighbors, you benefit from the social aspects. Homeownership also improves neighborhoods themselves. When people have an investment in a location, they tend to take better care of it.

Trilingual by Six by Lennis Dippel MD (Review)

Trilingual by Six is a cool little self-published book that I found at the library. Using the data that kids learn languages better and more easily than adults, Dippel writes about his quest as a monolingual older father to get his children fluent in at least three languages by age six. The book is part memoir, part advice on how to do it. Dippel is married to a native Spanish speaker, and he writes that his two children can speak Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, and English.