Chinese American guy fluent in Spanish

I just wanted to post this because I thought it was cool. The video is six years old, but I think this guy has the right idea about humbling oneself in order to learn a language. What comes out is his passion for the culture and people of Mexico, even though he eventually went with the Andalusian accent. In the videos, he talks about how he struck up conversations and made the most of the resources in his area of California. It’s refreshing to see Asian Americans moving beyond their ancestral languages.

“When I learn Chinese, I see myself as Chinese.”

In another thread, I told Snoopy that I would post about people being “more Chinese” or “less Chinese.” We had had this discussion some time ago after ChineseMom was banned from his wife’s site for obviously cultural reasons, and then we had it again years later, possibly in our Cultural Attraction thread, which is closely related to the topic on hand. Snoopy feels that there is no such thing as “more Chinese” or “less Chinese.” He feels that if you’re racially Chinese, that’s it; you’re Chinese. But as I mentioned to him in a follow-up post, Chinese really isn’t just a race; it’s a culture. Yes, an Asian person is racially Asian, but when we say that a person is more Chinese or less Chinese, we’re talking about his culture. Since I’ve been on a language binge, I thought I’d explain this by posting another excellent video by the polyglot Steve Kaufmann. (Apologies in advance if this runs like a stream of consciousness…it’s tax season (among other things), and I’ve been under time constraints.)

The New Chinese Immigrants

I am grateful to the HuffPo for publishing a new article on the newest Chinese immigrants and the differences in their political outlooks: New Chinese Immigrants Are Different From Chinese Americans And Proud Of It. I agree with just about everything that the author writes about the newest Chinese immigrants, i.e. those since the 1980’s. It’s about time that the world took notice of them. Politically, they’ve had a number of real achievements like SCA-5 and Justice for Peter Liang. If you look at the people who are standing up for real injustice against Asian Americans, it’s often the FOBs (see the video above), not the Social Justice Warriors. In terms of their grievances and ideas for the future, I can definitely see where these new immigrants are coming from. This is real Chinese culture imported to America, a take-it-or-leave-it in-your-face tough love for achievement. Like all cultures, it has its weaknesses, but like all cultures, it also has its strengths. I for one appreciate the “diversity” that is coming Stateside. (I put “diversity” in quotes because, as the author correctly mentioned, in some circles it’s code for “keep them Asians out.”)

White dude gets the lead role in “Crazy Rich Asians”

Henry Golding, courtesy of Clarence Aw

Uh, yeah, sorry Asian dudes. But a White guy got the lead in Crazy Rich Asians. Yeah, I know, Kevin Kwan was hinting at an all-Asian cast. And I know that y’all were hoping for some respite after Scarlett Johannson got the role as an Asian woman and Matt Damon got to rock the Great Wall. But chill, guys. It’s a movie about rich Asian people in Asia, so there will probably be lots of opportunities for bit roles and extras who can play the busboys, maids, and concierge workers at those crazy, rich Asian hotels. Lots and lots of roles, most of which probably don’t even require speaking, and you only have to show your face for a few seconds in front of the camera! How easy is that!

The Translation of Love by Lynne Kutuskake (Review)

Readers who like historical fiction might enjoy Lynne Kutsukake’s The Translation of Love. It’s a historical novel about life in post-war Japan following WWII. The novel focuses on a twelve-year old girl named Fumi who is trying to find her sister Sumiko, who has left home to become a hostess for American GI’s. Along with her friend Aya, a repatriated Japanese girl from the U.S., she writes a letter to General MacArthur in hopes that he will help her. Along the way, we meet several other interesting characters: Kondo, the girls’ homeroom teacher who moonlights as a translator; Matt and Nancy, two military translators who are Americans of Japanese descent; and Sumiko, the missing sister who is trying to make a living and support her family as best she can.

SJW’s and Anti-Asian Racism

It’s in the National Review, but it’s nice to see it out there anyway: Why Social Justice Warriors Think It’s Okay To Be Racist Towards Asians. It brings up many of the issues that we’ve discussed over the years. Asians get screwed by colleges in college admissions, Asians get targeted for violence on the streets, but no one sheds any tears for us.

Asian American Preppers

An Asian American FB friend posted this article from the New Yorker: Doomsday Prep For the Super-Rich. Evidently prepping just isn’t for the middle-class anymore. The super-rich are doing it too, which should be scary given that the super-rich now control the country. If they have no faith in their own ability to run it, then how should the rest of us feel? The article talks about rich peoples’ obsession with New Zealand as an escape. Even Peter Thiel, Mr. Trump’s most famous Silicon Valley backer, has invested in New Zealand as an escape destination when The Shit Hits The Fan (TSHTF). If Peter Thiel is hedging, what should the rest of us do?

White supremacists, Asian women, and Asian men

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(pic of Tila Tequila of the alt-right here.) Interesting article that I saw on FB: Meet the White Nationalist Trying to Ride The Trump Train to Lasting Power. It’s about a White Nationalist named Richard Spencer, and it was written before the election. Spencer was the person who coined the term “alt-right,” and he is widely seen as the founder of the movement. The article describes Spencer’s adulation of Donald Trump before the election. Now that the election is over and Trump has won, Spencer is flying high, talking about ending non-White immigration and turning this country into a European state. But what the people on my FB feed found interesting was that in the recent past, Richard Spencer was into Asian women:

Can We Have an Honest Conversation on Black-on-Asian Violence?

I’m writing this blog post for a number of reasons. First, it behooves me to mention some of the issues that more recent Asian American immigrants and immigrant human rights organizations have been dealing with. If you look at 4:46 of the video above, that’s a news story that has not been passed around by most of the Asian American blogosphere. If you read the typical Asian American blogs, it’s like it never happened. They only want to talk about how Peter Liang shot Akai Gurley.

Second, I wanted to take on Snoopy’s statement that