Jeremy Lin: Our Generation’s Joe Louis

Jeremy Lin scored 38 points tonight, a career-time high. I watched it live with my family. Jeremy and his team beat Kobe, the fourth Knicks victory in a row.

I’m not going to beat around the bush, nor will I wait to say this: Jeremy Lin is the Joe Louis of our time. I remember reading the Autobiography of Malcolm X, where Malcolm talks about the pride he felt when Joe Louis won the heavyweight crown. Well, we’re living in a different time, and we’re a different culture, but I’ll say it out loud: Jeremy Lin is our Joe Louis, whatever that means. These days no one cares about the boxing heavyweight champion of the world, no one cares about the MMA champion of the world. Instead, we value style and intelligence combined with style, size, and efficiency. In terms of the impact, Jeremy is the apotheosis of Asian American athletic achievement. In the world of sports, there is no bigger achievement than winning in basketball. And the fact that he beat Kobe is huge.

Joe Louis

Yes, we’ve had our Michael Chang. We’ve had our Apolo Ohno. And they are great athletes. But this is basketball. Basketball is the biggest sport in America, a sport where even in a team sport an individual can shine brighter than on any other stage. Eli Manning is no Michael Jordan. The fact is that within our culture, basketball is the world’s most prestigious stage.

The racists have already come out (e.g. Jason Whitlock). But who gives a shit? Really. One of our people just achieved an amazing feat on the world’s biggest stage, and that’s what matters most.

83 thoughts on “Jeremy Lin: Our Generation’s Joe Louis

  1. “All the Asian-American guys want to be Jeremy Lin,” she said. “And all the Asian-American girls want to marry him.”
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/11/sports/basketball/at-soho-bar-jeremy-lins-fans-share-his-heritage.html
    This line/article pretty much sums everything up.

    While the Christianity thing can get annoying (and I believe in God myself) and he’s an ivy leaguer (which is even more annoying), nobody’s perfect right?
    And he can definitely ball!

  2. I don’t think the comparison is overstated or unwarranted in any way. Jeremy Lin has, in a little over a week, become a cult hero to an underrepresented community.

  3. 38 points is against the Lakers and Kobe (who are not the what the were but still) has to put to rest any doubts there were about Lin. Like damn.

    I partially agree with you. While basketball is not the biggest sport in America, clearly football is, basketball offers a better stage to individual athletes (except maybe if you are a QB). World football (aka soccer) is the biggest sport in the world (go anywhere in Asia and the sell Manchester United stuff but not always Lakers stuff, and certainly not Knicks gear, though maybe now they will) but again basketball offers more exposure for individual athletes to shine/take over a game. Of course football is year round these days so Beckham can almost always be on TV. Tiger Woods and Beckham are the most well known athletes in the world.

    Assuming he keeps up his high level of play Lin might make more in endorsements then anybody in the NBA except for Kobe and LeBron.

  4. I watched the game also. That was an absolutely shocking performance. I thought Jeremy Lin would have a decent game but not like this. 38 points?! This from an Asian American kid who was undrafted out of Harvard, cut by two NBA teams, languished in the D-league, and playing on national TV in Madison Square Garden against Kobe and the Lakers with all pressure of the skeptics on him?

    Even his coach Mike D’Antoni said he was shocked looking at the stat sheet after the game because those 38 points came so easily and in the context of team basketball, and not just Lin taking a lot of shots.

    http://www.msg.com/videos/dantoni-postgame-win-vs-lakers-210

  5. This is a no-lose situation:

    If Jeremy Lin continues to tear it up, then we’ve all got an underdog Asian-American star to celebrate. The guy is staying on his brother’s couch on the Lower East Side at the moment — how awesome is that? (Maybe it’s the mystical power of the LES, launching pad of a million Asian American immigrants, that is really the magic juice here).

    If he finally returns to Earth, then the less-devout among us can enjoy some schadenfreude at the expense of a Tebow-esque “I’m going to start a ministry for urban youth” type. It’ll be a huge bummer to have to switch gears from cheering to that, but I’ll just reread that NY Times article linked above if I really need an instant buzzkill. In the meantime, when he talks about Jesus Christ, I’ll pretend he’s talking about his girlfriend.

  6. This is just awesome….I watched the game too and wasn’t sure if he was going to score 20 points against a more physical player in Derek Fisher and he goes out and gets 38 points!!! Even when Kobe switched with Fisher and was guarding Jeremy, he stayed calm and didn’t force any plays.

    I’m hoping that Jeremy’s success and national exposure starts to affect the popular culture in how Asian American males are viewed. And while the overt religious stuff kind of makes me wince, I also see it as a positive in that it helps him stay grounded and not get the big ego and get distracted by temptations when you become wealthy over night.

    What commentator Hubie Brown said in last night’s post game made me think about something else too. Brown said something along the lines of, this is how you play basketball (meaning, a team effort, praising his team mates) and that his parents raised him the right way. I got to thinking that having a spiritual center isn’t a bad thing, so who cares if he’s overt about it? As long as it helps him be a good person, then, why should I be wincing at the “praise be to God” stuff? And it got me thinking that maybe Brown was really talking about how this is the template for success: work hard, have the support of your family, stay out of trouble, do your best, and share the credit.

    Too often you see pro athletes getting into trouble—Plaxico Burrress shooting himself with his gun while carousing around a nightclub at some ungodly hour, or Gilbert Arenas with carrying guns into the Wizards locker room and horsing around with them, or Brett Favre and his unseemly text messages to females, etc. There are a lot of pro athletes that do a lot of good for the community and think of others, and then you have the knuckle heads who only think of themselves. Maybe Hubie Brown sees something refreshing in Jeremy’s outlook and the way he carries himself.

  7. B,

    “Jeremy Lin is the Joe Louis of our time. I remember reading the Autobiography of Malcolm X, where Malcolm talks about the pride he felt when Joe Louis won the heavyweight crown.”

    Jackie Robinson is more appropriate for JL. It’s extremely premature to compare him to Joe Louis, no less Walter Payton. We’re all proud of him. Manny Pacquiao is a global phenomenon that’s been tested and vetted — and absolutely dominant is every weight class appropriate. To dismiss him is sort of disingenuous.

  8. @mojo

    Completely agree with the religion issue. Did you see how dirty Blake was when he was defending Lin. Fisher was physical, but Blake was outright dirty.

  9. oh yeah—Blake was certainly trying to physically intimidate JL and started clutching at him and hacking him a few times across the arms. I don’t know why he wasn’t called for more fouls.

  10. He did it again!

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/basketball/nba/story/2012-02-11/Lin-takes-Knicks-into-Target-Center-vs-Minnesota-Timberwolves/53053022/1

    “Lin, who a week ago occupied one of the last seats on the bench, shot 8 of 24 for the game but still had 20 points, his fifth game in a row with at least 20. He has started the past four games, his first career starts, and his total of 109 points is the most of anyone in their first four starts since the NBA-ABA merger in 1976-77.

    “The most of anyone in their first four starts” since the MERGER? That’s insane!

    I watched a little of it, and he was way off in the second half with all those big guys ganging up on him, but he still managed to find his bearings under pressure and help the Knicks win.

    And Mojo, I agree with you on the religion thing when you wrote: “And while the overt religious stuff kind of makes me wince, I also see it as a positive in that it helps him stay grounded and not get the big ego and get distracted by temptations when you become wealthy over night. ”

    That’s probably similar to what Blacklisted was saying about Jackie Robinson–it seems like Lin’s religion is helping him to stay grounded, focused, and humble, all of which are great traits in a world class athlete and role model. If that’s what it takes to make an athletic superstar, then I’ll take it!

    I do wonder what they’re going to do with him when Baron Davis and Mello come back. If they don’t play him, at least he now has a name that will let him go elsewhere. I just hope he doesn’t come to the Portland Trailblazers–Paul Allen seems to fuck it up for anyone who gets involved with us!

  11. Coverage of him has been interesting; I think some folks don’t know what to make of him still or even how to address the issues of race / racism + Jeremy Lin.

    Commentary by David Leonard, Associate Professor in the Department of Critical Culture, Gender and Race Studies at Washington State University:
    http://newblackman.blogspot.com/2012/02/pride-and-prejudice-jeremy-lin-and.htm

    Sports Illustrated (surprise) setting the record straight that the first Asian American (and non-white player) in the NBA was actually Wat Misaka, a Japanese American, in 1947:
    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/writers/jon_wertheim/02/11/jeremy.lin.wataru.misaka/index.html

    I’m enjoying the Jeremy Lin coverage. Too bad the Knicks won’t be coming to play the Blazers for the rest of the season. I’d actually drive down to P-Town to see him play live!

  12. What does this mean? Apotheosis. I am perplexed. Is it a new space shuttle for NASA?

    N – Blake did it in front of cameras and a national audience. Unfair. He should have been called on it. You’re right. It’s not like they ganged up on JL and beat him down — thank goodness.

  13. What a douche, that Floyd. His mouth always gets him into trouble. He is extremely talented I must say, though. At least he doesn’t put a dagger to your back — I’ll give him that. I’m not too fond of passive-aggressives, especially ones that our too cliquish. I hope he fights Manny before he gets locked up and gets a taste of his own medicine.

    Peace.

  14. I wonder if the more established players are feeling any heat or threat from Jeremy’s arrival, as unlikely as it seems. His entrance has brought a lot of welcome excitement to the game, they should at least give him that.

    Any time they want to play for real and shut him out they’d probably ramp up the psych war and try to get to him. In my opinion as long as Jeremy keeps it cool and doesn’t injure himself and continues what he’s doing everything will be fine.

  15. I think that Jeremy Lin (an Manny Pacquiao for that matter) are the kind of sports role models that we talked about needing for Asian-Americans back on the 44s. There is just something about having an athlete that the entire city is cheering on that changes the image of men who look like him. This was certainly a factor in building the image of African-american men in this country. Much as intellectuals hate to admit it, universally applauded sports heroes are one of the fastest routes to changing how society perceives the men of their represented ethnic groups.

  16. @ King,
    excellent point….I really think JL is starting to affect the popular culture in how society perceives AA males. It wouldn’t surprise me to see more college coaches to start looking around to see if there are more talented AA athletes that are under the radar or overlooked. Just like the way major league baseball started looking towards Latin American to find talent….

    Now, JL certainly has a high level of talent, but I would hope that he isn’t just the exception.

    @B

    I’m no atheist, I believe in a cosmic engineer, but my spiritual concepts probably differs a lot from most mainstream Christian thought, although I don’t believe it’s inimical. I guess I wince at the overt religious stuff because I’m not comfortable with hearing some folks say or imply that it’s God’s will. To me, that’s denying free will and one’s personal achievements to say that it’s “all about God, I just give thanks to Him”. Well, God may have given you the talent and abilities—it’s still up to you to decide what you do with it. In other words, I suppose that I’d like for JL to take some credit and not just deflect it. But who knows? Maybe he’s far more spiritually advanced than I am, that maybe in some mystical sense, JL knows he has a purpose and mission in life and he senses intuitively that he’s been guided by some unknowable force. And to not acknowledge being blessed would be the lack of gratitude to the universe….I dunno.

    On the other hand, would he be as likeable if he were egotistical? if he didn’t share credit and praise his team mates but was all about me Me ME? If he came across as a self absorbed a-hole? Sorry, didn’t mean to get too metaphsyical here!

  17. I think Jeremy knows that his game speaks for himself, but without the support of his fans and also his team it would be too easy for people to turn him into a star one moment and then revile him the next. I think he wants to build a reputation for reliability that will last his basketball career.

  18. Okay, I just realised that there is no possible way I could actually possibly know THAT. I just had a brainfart moment. +_+’

  19. One of the reasons JLin’s been so successful on the court is because he’s the type of player who makes everyone on his team better. That kind of chemistry is hard to quantify, but it’s pretty apparent that Jeremy’s teammates like him and are happy he’s successful – guys like Tyson Chandler, Shumpert, Novak, etc. Landry Fields (who’s biracial Black/White) seems to be especially friendly with Jeremy Lin – they have the California connection and the Stanford-Harvard smarts. JLin crashed on Fields’ couch one night instead of his brother’s.

    More fun… Jeremy Lin superfan Spike Lee’s collection of nicknames he collected from Twitter, read slam poetry style:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5Hq40rs2ck

  20. One more before I go get a hair cut and write poetry in a Valentine’s Day card.

    You know why I look up to Jeremy Lin? He is a nonconformist, independent, brilliant, and a hard worker — not because he’s Chinese or Asian American. I would love to see more nonconformist AA men and women. People who can think for themselves, people that can be creative and bold even in the face of tyranny. Those people make it worth living — being able to watch them over the odds. It’s a great American story.

  21. I still think most Asian American’s would rather be Mark Zuckerberg than Jeremy Lin.

    And basketball is clearly not the biggest sport in America. It ranks behind football baseball and even auto racing.

    I think Asians getting hyped over this just like the sight of an Asian male challenging and beating large black males. Many Asians, especially leftist anti White Asian males, admire yet fear black males and envy the ability of black males to intimidate White men and f*** White women.

    Contrast this with issues of Asian inadequacy in these areas and it’s no wonder that non-basketball fans among Asians are in awe of Lin.

    At least for now.

  22. I still think most Asian American’s would rather be Mark Zuckerberg than Jeremy Lin.

    And basketball is clearly not the biggest sport in America. It ranks behind football baseball and even auto racing.

    I think Asians getting hyped over this just like the sight of an Asian male challenging and beating large black males. Many Asians, especially leftist anti White Asian males, admire yet fear black males and envy the ability of black males to intimidate White men and f*** White women.

    Contrast this with issues of Asian inadequacy in these areas and it’s not wonder that non-basketball fans among Asians are in awe of Lin.

    At least for now.

  23. N says:
    February 12, 2012 at 5:36 pm
    @ww

    Autoracing, seriously? I hope you’re not talking about NASCAR.

    Auto racing in America. NASCAR, Indy car etc. It’s not for me but it’s popular.

  24. “I still think most Asian American’s would rather be Mark Zuckerberg than Jeremy Lin.”

    Correction, most Asian American parents would rather their children to be like Mark Zuckerberg. Most of the Asian friends I knew back in highschool wanted to be Micheal Jordon.

  25. @ Wonder Why:

    “I think Asians getting hyped over this just like the sight of an Asian male challenging and beating large black males. Many Asians, especially leftist anti White Asian males, admire yet fear black males and envy the ability of black males to intimidate White men and f*** White women.
    Contrast this with issues of Asian inadequacy in these areas and it’s not wonder that non-basketball fans among Asians are in awe of Lin.”

    Wow. That comment speaks volumes more about your weird sexual preoccupations than it does about those of Jeremy Lin fans. How you managed to take a post about an Asian baller and make it about black men’s sexual prowess is quite a feat of imagination.

  26. Lol ES, sadly that wasn’t a feat of imagination, but actually unbridled mental illness.

    LOLOLOL

  27. E.S.

    I was thinking the exact same thing.

    Well, I guess there are probably some women crushin’ on Jeremy Lin, so I guess it’s okay for a dude to do the same, while crushin’ on black guys too. A little out of context though! :)

  28. Does anyone think Jason Whitlock should be fired? Is it another case of the Asian community not caring about comments? Whitlock was one of the journalists calling for Imus to step down for his comments. The Hypocrisy is disturbing.

  29. I found it weird that Jason Whitlock automatically assumed that
    1. Jeremy has a penis a couple of inches thick
    2. and that he would automatically ravage some poor lady’s vadge that same night.

    When you think about it, his comment was really kind of creepy. It’s better that people keep their sexual fantasies to themselves instead of blurting them out, but who knows maybe Jason couldn’t control himself. +_+’

  30. A dumb comment by Whitlock, but by no means a surprise.

    In the journalistic world… Whitlock is as big a race baiter as they come which is a huge statement given the Stephen A. Smiths, etc of the industry.

  31. He just probably wanted attention and knew he would get it with that tweet. Anyone that dumb? But it just goes to show you unfortunately, groups that have been discriminated feel they have a free pass to say anything about other groups. Same with the producer of “2 Broke Girls” who felt being gay gave him the right to write a horribly stereotypical Asian character on his show. I’m more bothered this is the same guy who criticized Don Imus. I’m pretty sure this tweet wasn’t spur of the moment and planned days ahead. Once again, no action by the network shows how no one really cares if Asian Americans are attacked.

  32. Also, I don’t want to read another post by some guy saying, if Whitlock was a white guy, he would have been fired. Those are tiresome.

  33. I don’t know what it is, but everyone is having a man crush on JL.

    They see a strong Asian man that has swag and all of a sudden they become obsessed with him. Next thing you know, they’ll send him emails, then hate mails, then pass his photo around — possibly even stalk him — and then maybe even hack his account. Fans are crazy these days. Lastly, he might even be accused of being a homo.

    This madness is quite gay. Monumental, nonetheless.

    Buddha bless him.

  34. ^^ Ha, I think everybody is enjoying Jeremy Lin making an even bigger fool of Floyd Mayweather than he already was. But he’s just stupid enough to keep on talking… and that’s good, because it probably will just be a motivation for JL to keep scoring.

  35. You know, sometimes I feel bad for Floyd. He does have a point as far as how it seems black athletes don’t get their due unless they really really shine (I also think it’s more personal for him since it’s obvious he doesn’t feel he gets enough props as an athlete).

    At the same time, however, I’d expect him to have some empathy for Lin and his fans, because like Byron says this is in many ways a parallel to how Black athletes have broken barries in the past.

  36. Well, a black guy might get that same superstar status by singing Mandarin songs in China…

    +_+’

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  38. Shot over Nowitski. Beat Jason Kidd. Beat the reigning NBA champion Mavericks. Cuban must’ve been going crazy.

    Really, he’s the new team leader. There’s no way to deny it.

    There truly are no limits for this young man.

  39. bigWOWO says:
    February 20, 2012 at 8:14 am
    Danny,

    Haha! Now that’s the important “social” movement!

    That’s what I’ve been saying on here all along. This is about an Asian male need to show Asian masculinity by beating the stereotypically masculine black athlete and to sexually attract WHITE women.

    I say it, everybody knows it, yet there is this resistance to admit it.

    Why?

  40. That’s funny, because whenever I think about sex with women, I think about having sex with them. At no time ever do black men (and in fact any men) enter my thoughts.

    Maybe something else has been going on with Wonder Why. :D

  41. Yeah WonderWoman seems to be all “hung up” on Black men.

    It cannot be that Asian people (both men and women) are simply celebrating the rise of a new Asian celebrity, in a field where there was none before. It has to be about beating Blacks, and/or attracting Whites.

    Anything for it not to be about Asians!

  42. If I were propositioned by a woman my mind would immediately focus almost single-mindedly on ravaging all her holes. At no point does a black guy suddenly pop up in my head.

    I want a show of hands here to see who else shares the same problem with Wonder Why. :D

  43. Wonderwall,

    By the way, it’s free to get your own blogger weblog. Totally free. I haven’t been looking, but I’m sure there “non-black-dudes-obsessed-with-black-dudes.blogspot.com” hasn’t yet been taken. I don’t believe that aaanybody feels the way you do about [black guys] now.

  44. He will not understand the concept of getting his own blog either.

    The Hungry Ghost festival is still a few months to go but some of these lost souls always end up coming out early. XD

  45. Again, I’ll try to restate it in clear terms despite the fact that most of you are playing a game of denial and misrepresentation.

    I suspect many of the readers who aren’t bothering to post get the point.

    OK kids here goes.

    Jeremy Lin’s recent success is happening in a sport that is overwhelmingly dominated by black males in a larger society that both views black males as hypermasculine and hyperathletic while often viewing Asian males as distinctly less masculine and less athletic than males of other races and in particular black males.

    If you don’t believe me, so be it. Maybe Asian males are in fact viewed as being just as masculine, even as violent or as athletic as males of any other race in America. If so then I am wrong.

    I am not discussing any male sexual interest in relation to black males. I was referencing FEMALE sexual interest in black males over Asian males and media representations of Asian males as less sexually attractive than black males.

    Several posters including the blog host have referenced WHITE female interest in relation to Asian males and it’s connection to Jeremy Lin.

    My points have been:

    1. Asian interest in Jeremy Lin is based in race. Asians want to see an Asian winning.

    2. The image of the Asian male as a nonathletic, less masculine male in America is something that many people hope will be countered by Jeremy Lin’s success.

    3. The image of the Asian male in America as a sexless nerd who is both often ignored by Asian women, including politically active ones, and ignored by White women as well is something many people hope will be countered by Jeremy Lin’s success. That has been referenced on this blog.

    3. The image of the black male a a sexless, nonathletic nerdy guy who can’t attract women especially White women is not a common stereotype in America.

    4. Jeremy Lin is proving himself as an athletic, competitive man in a sport that represents black male athletic success as much as any sport. This is even more true when you consider that unlike football you can more clearly see the race and faces of the players.

    I see no rational reason to deny this and I suspect the reason for the resistance, denial and misrepresentation has more to do with the fact that the messenger has been characterized as a “rice chaser” HBD threat etc and therefore there is an emotion reason for the denial, hostility and misrepresentation of my comments.

  46. You protest too much, Wonder Why. This blog has a lot of homosexual readers. We will never attack you for your sexual orientation. Just be honest with yourself already, there is no need to rationalise your fantasies regarding Asian and Black men. :D

  47. @ww

    I love you! (I’m straight, really) You’re really the perfect example of what a stereotypical ricechaser is and you’re doing everything to reinforce the stereotype that ricechasers are likely to be even more ‘hostile’ towards Asian guys (I use ‘hostile’ because in their minds they can’t be racist, because they are dating an asian girl).

    And being a ricechaser, you got the whole Lin thing dead wrong.
    Apart from a few white-loving HBDers, we never cared about being better than black athletes – what we see is a guy, who like the rest of us, had to work 20% more to get what we want just because the color of the skin and that’s the reason why we feel an instant connection and why we appreciate his success.

    It’s has never to do with Blacks – we might be celebrating even more if Lin was a successful.

  48. Stop using the racist word “ricechaser” to shame non-Asian men who are interested in dating or marrying Asian women. Are you that insecure? Moreover it is also sexist as you seek to rob the Asian woman of her personhood, referring to her as “rice.”

  49. ^ The word “Ricechaser” is not a word based on one’s race, but on one’s actions. Every single White guy who gets with an Asian girl is not a “Ricechaser.” That term is reserved for guys who develop a racist attraction to Asian females based on stereotype/fantasies rather than on normal individual attraction.

    But, nice try.

  50. ^
    Umm, well I have only heard it in the context of racist shamming for those, and only those who are non-Asian, who are interested in dating/marrying/have sex with Asian women. In any case the word clearly has at minimum racist implications and should not be uttered.

  51. ^In any case, Fun 9876 has at minimum racist contributions to this site and neither gives nor receives any benefit from the community, therefore he should find another site to post on.

    Wonderwall,

    You are the only one here who seems to think about black men when they see Jeremy Lin. That’s totally fine–obsess about black men as much as you want, it’s a free country. But you are the only one, dude.

  52. I wonder how WW feels when he sees the “Black Power” type of BM like Spike Lee rocking Jeremy Lin’s PAHS and Harvard jersey.

  53. Not to throw gasoline on the fire but I myself is confused with the word “ricechaser”

    If a man has a certain type of look he is attracted to, lets say Asian looks. He’s not stereotyping them as submissive, etc, does that still make him a ricechaser?

    We all know of Asians, Blacks, and other minorities who prefer blonde, blue eyed women. Are those guys attracted to them because they feel they are dumb or other blonde stereotypes. What can we call those guys?

    Also bringing up the AFCC, I’ve noticed many Asian Female Politicians are married to Asians ie Judy Chu or March Fong Eu. Is that because if they were married to WMs, they wouldn’t get the votes they needed? Just an interesting observation.

    I’ll say this, the AFCC club goes even further. My friend works in the entertainment industry (execs, assistants, editors, writers, etc) tells me every AF he knows e has either a white boyfriend or husband. He tells me there’s nothing like it anywhere else. Thoughts?

  54. “If a man has a certain type of look he is attracted to, lets say Asian looks. He’s not stereotyping them as submissive, etc, does that still make him a ricechaser?”

    I would say that the incorporation of how the “other” group of women are a “certain way” is usually part of the package, if you want to consider a guy a ricechaser. But then again, those attitudes are almost inseparable from an exclusive attraction to just one race of women. There is always a belief system there about their preferred group’s superiority.

  55. “I’ll say this, the AFCC club goes even further. My friend works in the entertainment industry (execs, assistants, editors, writers, etc) tells me every AF he knows e has either a white boyfriend or husband. He tells me there’s nothing like it anywhere else. Thoughts?”

    To be fair, I don’t think it’s “all”. I don’t know if you guys remember this xanga post that went viral a few years ago:

    http://somekoreanchick.xanga.com/665117840/why-i-will-never-date-a-white-guy-asian-girlwhite-guy-not-for-me/

    Basically some Korean chick (most likely the uber aZn pride, straight out of Ktown type) railing about how she would never date a white dude in fear of becoming “that girl” while looking down on the AF who bought into the bait hook, line, and sinker. I believe this girl mentioned a few times she worked in the Hollywood/Entertainment industry.

    However, I do think a lot of that has to do with just the immediate demographic and who they’re surrounded by. Even the corporate offices in the Entertainment industry don’t have too many AMs and the ones that do exist tend to be the quasi hipster types who date WF exclusively.

  56. To be fair, I think ALL attraction and partnerships out there derived at least slightly from an ingrained and preset preference by the parties involve.

    Likewise, I happen to give Hapas more brownie points when I’m out “hollering” even though I’m open to all race. Does that make me a Rice Cracker chaser??? :P

  57. Now matter how much they try to intellectualize it the term ricechaser is racist and is meant to shame non-Asian guys who are into Asian women. Pure and simple. It never gets applied to Asian guys who may be into Asian women for their own reasons.

  58. ^ By those criteria, Black girls who want a Black guy are all Jungle Fever-ers who are racist and have horrible preconceived stereotypes of the typical black men.

    Shame on them I say!

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