Asian Americans and Asian Australians

Check out Eurasian Sensation’s recent article in Peril Magazine where he talks about the differences between Asian Americans and Asian Australians. Check out the views that I shared, and tell me if I’m wrong or right about our culture. It’s good stuff, and it’s very good for both Asian Americans and Asian Australians to think about. The more knowledge we have, the more possibilities we’re able to see for our respective cultures.

Interesting side note: I enjoyed MasterChef in the U.S., but I got frustrated at the mean judge who kept screaming and insulting the contestants. He happened to have been born with privileged connections, being the son of Lidia, one of the most famous chefs in the world, and I thought he was out of line more often than not when he was shouting and insulting those less fortunate. But then I tuned into Australian MasterChef (because I knew there would be more Asian-style food), and the judges were just so damn nice that it put me to sleep faster than the Toby Imada triangle. They even gave them recipes to follow, and they helped them instead of cursing at them when they failed. Horrors! I guess this means Americans are assholes, and that Americans love assholes. So between Asian Australians and Asian Americans, if I were to bet on people being polite and helpful, I’m gonna double down on down under.

Also, blast from the past: Check out this old podcast with me, Larry, and Anna from Australia where we talk about Asian activism in America and in Australia. That was the first time I’d ever heard of the White Australian Policy.

 

8 thoughts on “Asian Americans and Asian Australians

  1. So is that the reason the PUA companies go to Australia? The Asians there are also pining for white women but can’t succeed? I’m sure some of these PUA companies see China as their big whale. Too bad for them Asians there have no problems getting women.

  2. King: Funny you bring that up because I’ve seen Asian PUA companies bring that up all the time a reason their company needs to exist. I’m just saying, if Asian males in China had a problem like supposedly Asian males in America with obtaining women, you’d probably see more PUA companies trying to get in there. The idea behind PUA seems more to be a westernized thing. Stuff like that wouldn’t fly in other cultures.
    I just can’t see something like this forcing men from China joining the PUA religion.

  3. Not sure how this became another PUA thread.

    Anyway, one of the points I wanted to expound upon from my article is that the Asian-American community seems to have stronger roots in the US, having been established a longer time ago; by comparison, the Asian-Australian community is more “fresh”… on the whole, Asians have not been in Australia for such a long time. And Australia takes in proportionally 5 times as many international students as the US does, which tends to replenish our Asian identity somewhat.

    I’m guessing that we’ve started to see the beginnings of some sort of surge in Asian-Australian achievement, impacting on popular culture and business. Australia had discriminatory immigration policies up until the late 60s, so the 70s saw the first significant wave of Asian immigration. So now the offspring of that pioneering generation, the first large cohort of Asian kids to grow up in Australia, are in their late 20s to early 40s, a prime time to achieve things. They speak better English and are better assimilated than their parents, and benefited from the struggle their parents made.
    As an example – there are 3 cooking shows on Australian TV right now that are hosted by Asian-Australians who are around their late 30s, all presenting very authentic Asian food but not a fobby accent between them. The winner of Masterchef 2 seasons ago was in of Malaysian descent and part of the same generation. There’s also been an explosion of Asian-influenced bar culture in Melbourne, mostly due to the entrepreneurial instincts of this generation.

  4. The majority of assessments from the Anglo-American media about the impact of the sex (not gender) imbalance in China are sensationalist.

    http://theweek.com/article/index/201797/chinas-looming-woman-shortage-5-possible-consequences

    ^ Most fall along the lines stated above.

    The way it pans out will be more prosaic.

    1. Marriages with women from outside China, for example North Korea, Vietnam, Russian Siberia, and some other countries where there are more women than men due to high male mortality.

    2. An increase in prostitution and human trafficking and a boom in vice syndicates. This is already big in China due to socio-economic factors alone, but will become even BIGGER. A frightening thought.

    3. Polyamorous relationships where the women have more sexual partners than the men and for a longer time frame.

    4. More bachelors dying alone and forgotten without a fuss, just like what happened to Chinese coolies in America, just like what Frank Chin wrote about.

    Things like PUA will not make even the smallest dent in what is to come because PUA offers men no real advantages. The majority of Asians are not stupid. Take a look at Thailand. There are no PUAs in Thailand. A PUA in Thailand is below even the level of a maggot. Thai people are very down to earth. PUA is not big in other Asian countries either because most Asians can sense the handicaps of the aspiring pick up artist.

    PUA is a white man’s disease and only unfortunate freaks of Asians can contract the same disease. 😀

  5. E.S.:

    Thanks!

    “As an example – there are 3 cooking shows on Australian TV right now that are hosted by Asian-Australians who are around their late 30s, all presenting very authentic Asian food but not a fobby accent between them. The winner of Masterchef 2 seasons ago was in of Malaysian descent and part of the same generation. There’s also been an explosion of Asian-influenced bar culture in Melbourne, mostly due to the entrepreneurial instincts of this generation.”

    Oh, wow! I think Asians in Australia may have more clout than Asian Americans–we had Ming Tsai, and I think that was it. Being located closer to Asia might have something to do with the big immigration numbers. In any case, it’s nice to see this taking place. Even here in the U.S., I think many of us know Kylie Kwong and Penny Wong.

    Another key difference might just be the American love of arguing and one-upping other people. I was talking to an Asian Canadian friend over the web about your article and the last paragraph, and he said, “yeah, Canadians are probably closer to Australians.” He thinks Americans are unique in the anglo world in that Americans often fight until one group finds itself powerless in a corner.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *